Language

 01


LANGUAGE

Attempting to speak in the language of the country is really appreciated by the citizens.

This can be in the form of a book or a phone application. While you might find that a lot of people speak English in large cities, it may be quite different in small towns or rural areas.

 

If you are traveling to a foreign nation, to avoid any awkward confrontations, do some research. This includes looking up standard phrases such as “thank you,” “how much” and “how are you.” You should also look around for standard customs of the country, such as gestures, so that you can avoid offending anyone with gestures or body language that seem normal to you.

A traveler should try to learn some of the language spoken at his or her destination if there is sufficient time to do so. Any dedicated traveler can get familiar with some useful phrases, though fluency in any language is difficult to achieve. Learning a bit of the lingo will enhance the traveler’s experience or even prove helpful in case of unexpected difficulties.

 

Learn a few basic phrases in the local language. While it is impractical to attempt to learn the entire language of every country you visit, you should focus on memorizing some key phrases to make your journey easier. This is especially true if you have dietary restrictions, so you can inform your waiter properly and avoid potential allergies.

 02


LANGUAGE

Language is the key to making your trip easier and getting better service. Foreign travel is great fun until you need to ask for something in a location where you are confronted with only native speakers. Learning a few phrases about general things and some specific to service related needs can save you from playing charades when you really need help.

Pick up a few newspapers while you are traveling overseas. A newspaper makes a great souvenir. It will remind you of what was happening in that locale on the days you were there if you are able to read the language. Consider using it as wrapping paper for the gifts that you bring home to your friends and family if you can’t read it. It will add another unique touch to your presents.

Learn the phrases “I need sugar,” “I have diabetes,” and “I need a doctor.”


When traveling to a country where you do not speak the language and you have diabetes, it is important to learn a few key phrases to in the language of the country or countries where you will be traveling.

 

When you are going to a foreign country which speaks a different language you should be sure to teach yourself the top 20 – 50 useful words. While the ideal situation would be to speak fluently, when you just know some of the most basic ideas and phrases it will help you get along.

 03


To avoid any awkward confrontations, do some research if you are traveling to a foreign nation. This includes looking up standard phrases such as “thank you,” “how much” and “how are you.” You should also look around for standard customs of the country, such as gestures, so that you can avoid offending anyone with gestures or body language that seem normal to you.

 

In countries that you travel to, be aware of the cultural view of how questions are answered. In some places, especially India and Asia, it can be considered very rude to tell someone that you don’t know the answer to their question. Others may simply answer “yes” to any question asked in English. Pay attention to doubtful body language.

If you’re traveling to a country where you’re likely to want to enjoy a bottle of wine, bring along your own corkscrew. If you don’t know the area or speak the language, tracking down a corkscrew just for that impromptu picnic can turn a relaxing afternoon into a harried scavenger hunt.

 

If you will be traveling to a foreign country where English is not the primary language, please make the effort to learn at least a few basic phrases, and make sure your pronunciation is as close as possible to the real thing. Most non-English speakers will quickly realize that you don’t actually speak their tongue, and will meet you more than halfway in a helpful attempt to communicate, if you start out in THEIR language. Starting out in English, on the other hand, sends the message that they need to communicate on your terms, which is impolite.

 04


TRAVEL

If you wish to travel abroad, try learning about the language.

You can easily find small guides that contain all the essential words, in case you get lost or need something. Do not assume that everybody will speak people and English will be more friendly if you try speaking their language.

 

If you lose any of it, taking photos of your luggage can be a lifesaver. In the event that you lose your luggage at an airport, it can be very difficult to describe how it looks and how it is different from all of the other luggage bags! If you are traveling to a foreign country with a language you do not speak, it can be downright impossible to describe your luggage without a picture, also.

When you are going to a foreign country which speaks a different language you should be sure to teach yourself the top 20 – 50 useful words. While the ideal situation would be to speak fluently, when you just know some of the most basic ideas and phrases it will help you get along.

 

If you have any dangerous food allergies and are traveling abroad, make sure you are familiar with the foods in that country. Make sure you do not eat any entrees with your allergic ingredient, or you can ask the waiter in that language if that ingredient is in what you are ordering.

 05


When planning to travel to a country that uses a very different language or even alphabet than your own, it’s a good idea to get precise, up to date information about exactly how to travel to hotel bookings or sites of interest ahead of time. Often, maps or travel guides won’t go into the amount of detail necessary, so make sure to have a custom map which shows everything you’ll need.

Make sure you keep a matchbook, business card or some other small item from the hotel when you’re going out.


Learn the language about food if you are going to a foreign country, so that you can ask servers about ingredients in the food that cause you to have allergic reactions. Most especially if you have severe reactions to foods, you need to become somewhat fluent in the food related words of the native language. This will help you ask locals about foods you want to avoid. Also, if the worst happens, you’ll be able to tell a doctor about your allergies.

 

If there is sufficient time to do so, a traveler should try to learn some of the language spoken at his or her destination. Any dedicated traveler can get familiar with some useful phrases, although fluency in any language is difficult to achieve. Learning a bit of the lingo will enhance the traveler’s experience or even prove helpful in case of unexpected difficulties.

 06


TRAVEL

Pick up a few newspapers while you are traveling overseas. A newspaper makes a great souvenir.

If you are able to read the language, it will remind you of what was happening in that locale on the days you were there. Consider using it as wrapping paper for the gifts that you bring home to your friends and family if you can’t read it. It will add another unique touch to your presents.

 

When traveling to a foreign country, try to learn at least a few words of the language. Knowing how to say simple phrases like “how are you”, “may I have the check”, or “where is the bathroom” can help tremendously as you navigate throughout your destination. It also helps the locals to see that you are making an effort, which may make them friendlier toward you.

Pick up a few newspapers while you are traveling overseas. A newspaper makes a great souvenir. If you are able to read the language, it will remind you of what was happening in that locale on the days you were there. Consider using it as wrapping paper for the gifts that you bring home to your friends and family if you can’t read it. It will add another unique touch to your presents.

 

You may want to hold off on going to a foreign country which speaks another language if you have never even traveled within your own country. There are some real skills associated with travel in general and you will want to develop the basic ones before you jump in head first.

 07


Travel can be a fun-filled activity, but always remember to learn at least a few words of the native language. Phrases such as ‘I’m lost’ and ‘Where is the train station, though ‘thank and ‘Please’ you’ are a must? ‘ will prove invaluable in the event you actually need them. It’s much easier than trying to act out complicated activities!

Study up on the language of the area you are planning to travel to before you leave.


Language barriers can be tricky. Obviously, you can manage in a foreign country without speaking the language. Even so, it is always a good idea to brush-up on important words like “police” or “hospital.”

 

When planning to travel to a country that uses a very different language or even alphabet than your own, it’s a good idea to get precise, up to date information about exactly how to travel to hotel bookings or sites of interest ahead of time. Often, maps or travel guides won’t go into the amount of detail necessary, so make sure to have a custom map which shows everything you’ll need.

 08


In countries that you travel to, be aware of the cultural view of how questions are answered.

In some places, especially India and Asia, it can be considered very rude to tell someone that you don’t know the answer to their question. Others may simply answer “yes” to any question asked in English. Pay attention to doubtful body language.

 

If you are traveling to a foreign country and are not fluent in the language, make sure you can always arrive safely back at your lodging by carrying its name, phone number and address with you. Use a piece of hotel stationery or a business card or matchbook labeled with the appropriate information. Alternatively, write it on a piece of paper. If you get lost, simply show the information to a taxi driver, and, before you know it, you’ll be back at home base.

Learn a few basic phrases in the local language. While it is impractical to attempt to learn the entire language of every country you visit, you should focus on memorizing some key phrases to make your journey easier. This is especially true if you have dietary restrictions, so you can inform your waiter properly and avoid potential allergies.

 

Visit a small hospital beforehand if you are traveling with small children. If your child gets lost, their personal information is available, they can give your child an identification bracelet so that. If you are traveling to another country, get the identification tag in the language of the country you are visiting.